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In re: Death Penalty Abolition Reaffirmation Act of 2020

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In re: Death Penalty Abolition Reaffirmation Act of 2020
Seal of the United States Supreme Court
Decided August 19, 2020
Full case nameState of Dixie v. Comped
Docket no.20-16
Citations101 M.S.Ct. 120
ArgumentOral argument
Opinion announcementOpinion announcement
Case history
PriorJudgment for plaintiff in part, Case No. 20-06
Holding
The Dixie Legislature acted constitutionally in abolishing the death penalty and did not violate earlier statute, the First Amendment or the Commerce Clause. Supreme Court of Dixie reversed.
Court membership
Chief Justice
SHOCKULAR
Associate Justices
JJEagleHawk  · CuriositySMBC  · Joseph Ibney  · Dobs  · BSDDC  · Dewey Cheatem
Case opinion
MajorityCheatem, joined by unanimous
Laws applied
U.S. Const. art. I, U.S. Const. amend. I

In re: Death Penalty Abolition Reaffirmation Act of 2020, 101 M.S.Ct. 120 (2020), was a decision of the United States Supreme Court on August 19, 2020, that reviewed the General Assembly of Dixie's adoption of the Death Penalty Abolition Reaffirmation Act of 2020. The Dixie statute, which purported to abolish the death penalty in the state, provide for resentencing, prohibit the import of death penalty drugs by the state corrections department, and proscribe facilitation of executions in foreign jurisdictions by state employees, was held unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of Dixie under a Dormant Commerce Clause theory and a supposed violation of the First Amendment rights of public employees.

On appeal, a unanimous Supreme Court eviscerated the legal reasoning of the state court as thoroughly flawed and found the statute to be compliant with the Commerce Clause and First Amendment. The decision of the Supreme Court of Dixie was reversed.

See also